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Jump statements

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Jump statements

Jump statements unconditionally transfer control.

jump-statement:
break-statement
continue-statement
goto-statement
return-statement
throw-statement




The location to which a jump statement transfers control is called the target of the jump statement.

When a jump statement occurs within a block, and when the target of the jump statement is outside that block, the jump statement is said to exit the block. While a jump statement may transfer control out of a block, it can never transfer control into a block.

Execution of jump statements is complicated by the presence of intervening try statements. In the absence of such try statements, a jump statement unconditionally transfers control from the jump statement to its target. In the presence of such intervening try statements, execution is more complex. If the jump statement exits one or more try blocks with associated finally blocks, control is initially transferred to the finally block of the innermost try statement. When and if control reaches the end point of a finally block, control is transferred to the finally block of the next enclosing try statement. This process is repeated until the finally blocks of all intervening try statements have been executed.

In the example

static void F()
finally
}
finally
}
Console.WriteLine('After break');
}

the finally blocks associated with two try statements are executed before control is transferred to the target of the jump statement.

The break statement

The break statement exits the nearest enclosing switch, while, do, for, or foreach statement.

break-statement:
break ;

The target of a break statement is the end point of the nearest enclosing switch, while, do, for, or foreach statement. If a break statement is not enclosed by a switch, while, do, for, or foreach statement, a compile-time error occurs.

When multiple switch, while, do, for, or foreach statements are nested within each other, a break statement applies only to the innermost statement. To transfer control across multiple nesting levels, a goto statement (8.9.3) must be used.

A break statement cannot exit a finally block (8.10). When a break statement occurs within a finally block, the target of the break statement must be within the same finally block. Otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.

A break statement is executed as follows:

If the break statement exits one or more try blocks with associated finally blocks, control is initially transferred to the finally block of the innermost try statement. When and if control reaches the end point of a finally block, control is transferred to the finally block of the next enclosing try statement. This process is repeated until the finally blocks of all intervening try statements have been executed.

Control is transferred to the target of the break statement.

Because a break statement unconditionally transfers control elsewhere, the end point of a break statement is never reachable.

The continue statement

The continue statement starts a new iteration of the nearest enclosing while, do, for, or foreach statement.



continue-statement:
continue ;

The target of a continue statement is the end point of the embedded statement of the nearest enclosing while, do, for, or foreach statement. If a continue statement is not enclosed by a while, do, for, or foreach statement, a compile-time error occurs.

When multiple while, do, for, or foreach statements are nested within each other, a continue statement applies only to the innermost statement. To transfer control across multiple nesting levels, a goto statement (8.9.3) must be used.

A continue statement cannot exit a finally block (8.10). When a continue statement occurs within a finally block, the target of the continue statement must be within the same finally block. Otherwise a compile-time error occurs.

A continue statement is executed as follows:

If the continue statement exits one or more try blocks with associated finally blocks, control is initially transferred to the finally block of the innermost try statement. When and if control reaches the end point of a finally block, control is transferred to the finally block of the next enclosing try statement. This process is repeated until the finally blocks of all intervening try statements have been executed.

Control is transferred to the target of the continue statement.

Because a continue statement unconditionally transfers control elsewhere, the end point of a continue statement is never reachable.

The goto statement

The goto statement transfers control to a statement that is marked by a label.

goto-statement:
goto identifier ;
goto
case constant-expression ;
goto default ;

The target of a goto identifier statement is the labeled statement with the given label. If a label with the given name does not exist in the current function member, or if the goto statement is not within the scope of the label, a compile-time error occurs. This rule permits the use of a goto statement to transfer control out of a nested scope, but not into a nested scope. In the example

class Test
,
};

foreach (string str in args)
}
}

Console.WriteLine(' not found', str);
continue;
done:
Console.WriteLine('Found at [][]', str, row, colm);
}

}

}a goto statement is used to transfer control out of a nested scope.

The target of a goto case statement is the statement list in the immediately enclosing switch statement (8.7.2) which contains a case label with the given constant value. If the goto case statement is not enclosed by a switch statement, if the constant-expression is not implicitly convertible (6.1) to the governing type of the nearest enclosing switch statement, or if the nearest enclosing switch statement does not contain a case label with the given constant value, a compile-time error occurs.

The target of a goto default statement is the statement list in the immediately enclosing switch statement (8.7.2) which contains a default label. If the goto default statement is not enclosed by a switch statement, or if the nearest enclosing switch statement does not contain a default label, a compile-time error occurs.

A goto statement cannot exit a finally block (8.10). When a goto statement occurs within a finally block, the target of the goto statement must be within the same finally block, or otherwise a compile-time error occurs.

A goto statement is executed as follows:

If the goto statement exits one or more try blocks with associated finally blocks, control is initially transferred to the finally block of the innermost try statement. When and if control reaches the end point of a finally block, control is transferred to the finally block of the next enclosing try statement. This process is repeated until the finally blocks of all intervening try statements have been executed.



Control is transferred to the target of the goto statement.

Because a goto statement unconditionally transfers control elsewhere, the end point of a goto statement is never reachable.

The return statement

The return statement returns control to the caller of the function member in which the return statement appears.

return-statement:
return expressionopt ;

A return statement with no expression can be used only in a function member that does not compute a value, that is, a method with the return type void, the set accessor of a property or indexer, the add and remove accessors of an event, an instance constructor, a static constructor, or a destructor.

A return statement with an expression can be used only in a function member that computes a value, that is, a method with a non-void return type, the get accessor of a property or indexer, or a user-defined operator. An implicit conversion (6.1) must exist from the type of the expression to the return type of the containing function member.

It is an error for a return statement to appear in a finally block (8.10).

A return statement is executed as follows:

If the return statement specifies an expression, the expression is evaluated and the resulting value is converted to the return type of the containing function member by an implicit conversion. The result of the conversion becomes the value returned to the caller.

If the return statement is enclosed by one or more try blocks with associated finally blocks, control is initially transferred to the finally block of the innermost try statement. When and if control reaches the end point of a finally block, control is transferred to the finally block of the next enclosing try statement. This process is repeated until the finally blocks of all enclosing try statements have been executed.

Control is returned to the caller of the containing function member.

Because a return statement unconditionally transfers control elsewhere, the end point of a return statement is never reachable.

The throw statement

The throw statement throws an exception.

throw-statement:
throw expressionopt ;

A throw statement with an expression throws the value produced by evaluating the expression. The expression must denote a value of the class type System.Exception or of a class type that derives from System.Exception. If evaluation of the expression produces null, a System.NullReferenceException is thrown instead.

A throw statement with no expression can be used only in a catch block, in which case it re-throws the exception that is currently being handled by the catch block.

Because a throw statement unconditionally transfers control elsewhere, the end point of a throw statement is never reachable.

When an exception is thrown, control is transferred to the first catch clause in an enclosing try statement that can handle the exception. The process that takes place from the point of the exception being thrown to the point of transferring control to a suitable exception handler is known as exception propagation. Propagation of an exception consists of repeatedly evaluating the following steps until a catch clause that matches the exception is found. In this description, the throw point is initially the location at which the exception is thrown.

In the current function member, each try statement that encloses the throw point is examined. For each statement S, starting with the innermost try statement and ending with the outermost try statement, the following steps are evaluated:

If the try block of S encloses the throw point and if S has one or more catch clauses, the catch clauses are examined in order of appearance to locate a suitable handler for the exception. The first catch clause that specifies the exception type or a base type of the exception type is considered a match. A general catch clause (8.10) is considered a match for any exception type. If a matching catch clause is located, the exception propagation is completed by transferring control to the block of that catch clause.

Otherwise, if the try block or a catch block of S encloses the throw point and if S has a finally block, control is transferred to the finally block. If the finally block throws another exception, processing of the current exception is terminated. Otherwise, when control reaches the end point of the finally block, processing of the current exception is continued.

If an exception handler was not located in the current function member invocation, the function member invocation is terminated. The steps above are then repeated for the caller of the function member with a throw point corresponding to the statement from which the function member was invoked.

If the exception processing terminates all function member invocations in the current thread, indicating that the thread has no handler for the exception, then the thread is itself terminated. The impact of such termination is implementation-defined.



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